Words for the Times

A few words to suit the times, that I found in one of the works of Alexandre Dumas:

 

“When a man’s existence weighs supreme in a great nation’s interests, honour, and destiny, when minds are led to foresee the success or collapse of a great fortune and begin to consider the possibilities that success or failure could mean, then friends and enemies stand facing each other, calculating the possible consequences of their hate for or their devotion to a man whose star is rising but who might be brought down at any moment.

It is a time for augurs, for portents, for prognostication. Even dreams wield a secret influence, and everyone is ready to be guided into the unknown country of the future by one of those bright, vaporous phantasms that escape from night’s kingdom through the gates of horn or the gates of ivory.

Some diviners, out of their natural timidity or mania for seeing the bad side of any circumstance or occasion, are easily alarmed and cannot refrain from giving warnings about all sorts of imaginary dangers. Others, on the contrary, view the world from but a single perspective that sees only easy means and happy ends. They would press a Caesar or a Bonaparte in whatever direction he might blindly choose to go, without giving a thought to dangers unforeseen.

Still others – those who have fallen; those on whom the man of genius or darling of chance or Providence has trampled – vent their impotent rage in sinister vows and threatening signs filled with bloody promises. These become the preoccupations of troubled minds in troubled times.”

Alexandre Dumas (père), The Last Cavalier (Le Chevalier de Sainte-Hermine), Ch. XXIX

Let’s be careful in these times, such that we are not dominated by wrenching, enraged reactions and perilous prognostications, but rather by circumspect observation and considered response.

© 2017 Peter McLean, Lamplighter Performance Consulting

www.lamplighter.com.au

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© 2016-2017 Peter McLean, Lamplighter Performance Consulting

www.lamplighter.com.au

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5 Days to Your Best Year Ever

New Year’s Resolutions are often the bane of people’s existence: they set some goals, have great intentions, but don’t gain traction.

I often work with clients to set strategic personal and business goals and put in place the mechanisms and resources to achieve them. As a sample of this process, I have a pdf eBook available that you can obtain here on my site, The Lamplighter Guide to A Great New Year. You may already have a copy. It’s a great process that I devised for setting important, meaningful goals – and achieving them.

Michael Hyatt, however, has just opened enrolment to his 2017 Course of 5 Days to Your Best Year Ever. If you’re looking for an online course that can help you set great goals, you honestly can’t get better than this. It’s like my eBook amped with Olympic-level drug enhancement and supported by Russian hackers. (Just kidding about the hackers – there is no evidence they were involved.)

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Michael follows a similar process (more…)

Turning Around Company Culture

I was meeting with the CEO of a very successful publicly listed Company, who said he’d taken about 15 months to turn the culture of his business around from bureaucratic to collaborative, and that has slowed down growth and innovation.

It’s a big company and he had a big job to do, but when I work with organisations and leaders, we aim to turn the direction of organisational cultures around within 3-6 months – quicker if we have the necessary qualitative data and conditions (most quantitative data is often shallow and insufficient to the cultural change process – it’s over-rated).

The keys to these turnarounds are: (more…)

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